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hosted by Chess Queen™ & 12th Women's World Chess Champion Alexandra Kosteniuk

 

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Young Chess Players Set to Compete in Honor of Defeating Breast Cancer

Hello everyone,


Charity and chess do go together. Here is a press release for such an event. We wish everyone the joy of chess and salute everyone promoting chess for a cause. 

Fremont, CA (PRWEB) April 19, 2014
Nearly every family has been touched by the disease known broadly as cancer. Every May, we set aside a date to honor our Mothers but this year, rather than just honoring Mothers, we can come together to help defend them against Breast Cancer at a chess tournament in Fremont, California. Chris Torres, the President of the Torres Chess and Music Academy feels that, "Chess is about making good choices. If you value your child's chess education and hate cancer, the choice is easy. Come to our tournament in Fremont on May third."


The Torres Chess and Music Academy is a nonprofit organization whose chess programs regularly produce top best scholastic chess players in the country. In 2013, Mission San Jose Elementary School, again, became the National Elementary Chess Champions. On May 3, 2014 the Torres Chess and Music Academy will be hosting a chess tournament in the fight against cancer at Mission San Jose Elementary School. All students who attend will receive awards and help raise money to fight breast cancer in honor of Mother's Day.

This year's tournament should raise even more money for breast cancer research thanks to a sponsorship by Steve and Kate's Camp. Steve and Kate have been running the best summer activity camps for children since 1980. Steve and Kate’s Camp lets campers choose activities such as stop motion animation, soccer in an inflatable stadium, rock climbing on a 30 foot wall, bread making, knitting with bamboo needles, music recording in custom vocal booths, and pie throwing. A Steve and Kate representative will be on hand at the chess tournament to answer any questions about their awesome summer programs.

The Torres Chess and Music Academy will also be well represented at the May 3 chess tournament. Many of the TCAMA’s top coaches will be on hand to provide chess analysis and to otherwise assist in making the tournament an educational experience for all attendees. In addition, the Torres Chess and Music Academy will be providing live music and will have plenty of information available about summer chess activities in the area.

Don't miss out on a great opportunity to participate in a fantastic chess event while celebrating our Mothers. For round times, and registration please visit the Torres Chess and Music Academy online.

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Kramnik Chess Trivia: What has the Russian Won, Where, When?

Hello everyone,


World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen has confessed that he has been influenced by Russian GM Vladimir Kramnik's games. Kramnik has a very special place in chess history. Can you say, in the photograph, what has he won, where and when?




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Thailand Chess: GM Vallejo Pons wins 14th BCC Open 2014, GM Barbosa is second on tiebreak

Hi everyone,

Thailand has annually held the BCC Chess Open regularly. Here is a report by Alexander J. Klemm via the official website.


GM Vallejo Pons wins 14th BCC Open 2014, GM Barbosa is second on tiebreak
The last round of the 14th Bangkok Chess Club Open 2014 saw the much anticipated clashes GM Oliver Barbosa (7) vs. GM Francisco Vallejo Pons (7) on the first board, and GM Jan Gustafsson (6½) vs. GM Bartosz Socko (6½) on the second. Yet, their games were somewhat anticlimactic, as no risks were taken. The players agreed to strategic draws after two hours, assuring them all top rankings and prize money.

The Spanish Grandmaster and tournament number one seed GM Francisco Vallejo Pons wins with 7½ points. Congratulations to ‘Paco’ and many thanks for his return to the BCC Open after his first appearance in 2011. We hope he will come back again next year to defend his title. The runner-up is GM Oliver Barbosa, who also reached an impressive 7½ points. GM Barbosa also won the Blitz tournament for the second year running, against stiff competition. Congratulations to the mighty Filipino for his outstanding performance. GM Jan Gustafsson, IM Qingnan Liu and GM Bartosz Socko all reached a very solid 7 points, putting them in 3rd to 5th place.

Round 9 results at top boards:
GM Oliver Barbosa (7) ½ – ½ GM Francisco Vallejo Pons (7)
GM Jan Gustafsson (6½) ½ – ½ GM Bartosz Socko (6½)
GM Suat Atalik (6) ½ – ½ GM Darwin Laylo (6)
GM John Paul Gomez (6) ½ – ½ GM Marat Dzhumaev (6)
GM M.R. Venkatesh (6) 0 – 1 IM Qingnan Liu (6)

Final ranking of top players after round 9:
1-2 (7½ pts.): GM Francisco Vallejo Pons, GM Oliver Barbosa
3-5 (7 pts.): GM Jan Gustafsson, IM Qingnan Liu, GM Bartosz Socko
6-12 (6½ pts.): GM John Paul Gomez, GM Suat Atalik, GM Marat Dzhumaev, IM Aleksandar Wohl, IM Roy Saptarshi, IM Rolando Nolte, GM Monika Socko

A GM norm was achieved by fourth-placed IM Qingnan Liu from China and a WIM norm by Ying Zhu (5 ½), also from China. Best lady player is Polish GM Monika Socko (6½). Best juniors are the Chinese youngsters Yan Liu (6) and Xiongjian Peng (6), as well as Richi Sardana (5½) from Australia. Congratulations to these players for their well-earned successes.

In the Challenger category, this year’s 14th BCC Open champion is Leonardo Alidani from the Philippines. He scored six points, as did his fellow countryman Marvin Ting, who is second based on tiebreak. Thotsaporn Thanatipanonda (THA), Kumar Samuel (IND) and Trong Binh Phan (VIE) scored 5½ points, which puts them on 3rd to 5th place.

Please visit chess-results.com for complete rankings, results and further details about the tournament.

A very big thank you goes to the 210 players from Asia and around the world for their hard-fought games and the many chess fans who followed the action in the playing hall and live online.

We thank our sponsors Thai Bev, Univentures, PYN Fund Management, Tourism Authority of Thailand, Chess4Thai, and the marvelous playing venue hosted by the Dusit Thani Bangkok Hotel. The tournament could not happen without their wonderful and generous support.

Many thanks also to all the members of the dedicated BCC Open tournament team who kept the tournament running smoothly at all times.

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University Chess in Pakistan: Karachi Varsity Retains Title

Hello everyone,

Some chess news from South Asia: FIDE reports on the Pakistan University chess: The Pakistan Chess Federation in collaboration with the country's Higher Education Commission organised the All-Pakistan Inter Universities Chess Championships from 13th April to 17th April in Faisalabad, the country's third biggest city. A record number of 24 universities took part with three members each and a reserve players. 

Top-seed Karachi University beat their arch rival Punjab University in the final to win the title for the second year in a row. Although the latter had better ranked players in its team. The University of Veterinary Sciences squeezed into third place.

The Inter University Tournament has become a regular feature to take place as a prelude to the National Chess Championships in Pakistan every year. Based on the individual scores on respective tables, three top players are selected to give them a berth in the country's premier National Chess Championships which for 2014 are going to take place in Lahore from 25th April. In Faisalabad, the qualifiers were Awad of Karachi University, Arqam of Punjab University and Ahmad Ali from Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences. *Find more photos at FIDE


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US Chess #1 Hikaru Nakamura sponsored by RedBull!

Hello everyone,

The #1 US player Hikaru Nakamura has a new and exciting sponsor: Redbull. "Always try to win at all costs", he says on his page on the Redbull website. Nakamura is currently the #8 player in the World.

Here is the Red Bull page for Hikaru Nakamura! *below is the bio and one of the photos on the page. 




Hi, my name is Hikaru Nakamura. My discipline ischess. My friends call me Hikaru, but I’ve been known by my handles: Smallville, CapilanoBridge, and Star Wars. I was born on 9 December 1987 in Osaka, Japan. My special talent istrying to win at all costs. My philosophy of life is live every moment, every game as though it is your last. The most important person in my life ismy mother. My favourite food ispasta. My favourite music is a mix of rock and folk/indie.

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Friday, April 18, 2014

History Chess Trivia Photo: Name the Grandmaster

Hello everyone,

Here is some history chess trivia: Can you name the Grandmaster? Hint: |The role of chess Grandmaster Kronsteen in James Bond movie 'From Russia with Love' was based on this GM!


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19-Year-Old Aleksandar Indjic is Serbia Chess Champion 2014

Hello everyone,

The latest chess tournament news via FIDE is that 19-year-old Grandmaster Aleksandar Indjic is the new Serbian chess champion for men. He was the sole winner of the prestigious 12-player round robin tournament and deservedly got the top prize of 1000 EU. Collecting 7,5/11, Indjic left the nearest opponent half a point behind. GM Milos Perunovic became second with 7 points, while GM Nikola Sedlak took the bronze with 6,5 points.

The event took place from 7th to 17th April, 2014, at Hotel Patria, in Subotica, Serbia.


Final standings:
1. GM Indjic Aleksandar (2523) 7,5
2. GM Perunovic Milos (2631) 7
3. GM Sedlak Nikola (2568) 6,5
4. GM Markus Robert (2610) 6
5. GM Damljanovic Branko (2566) 6
6. GM Popovic Dusan (2540) 5,5
7. GM Miladinovic Igor (2583) 5,5
8. IM Nestorovic Nikola (2427) 5
9. IM Nestorovic Dejan (2422) 5
10. GM Lajthajm Borko (2539) 4,5
11. IM Cabarkapa Novak (2392) 4
12. IM Sarenac Ivan (2407) 3,5


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FIDE World Rapid and Blitz Chess Championships 2014 in Dubai June 15

Hello everyone,


The FIDE World Rapid and Blitz Chess Championships 2014 will be held at the Dubai Culture & Chess Club in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, from 15th June to 21st June 2014.

The events will be both Swiss pairings tournaments and will be held over two days for Blitz and three days for Rapid.

The Blitz will have twenty one (21) rounds, with a single game for each round, Swiss event. The Rapid will be fifteen (15) rounds, with a single game for each round, Swiss event.

In the Blitz Championship, each player will have 3 minutes + 2 seconds additional time per move, starting from move 1.

In the Rapid Championship, each player will have 15 minutes + 10 seconds additional time per move, starting from move 1.

Participation
1. All players rated at least 2500 in any of the three FIDE rating lists (Standard, Blitz or Rapid) as at the 1st of March 2014 are eligible to participate in the World Blitz Championship.
2. The Blitz & Rapid Championships are open to all the National Champions representing their National Chess Federation regardless of their title or rating.
3. Applications have to be sent by the national federations only.
4. Application form must be submitted online on www.Dubai2014wrb.com/registration not later than 10.05.2014.

The prize fund for each event, Rapid and Blitz, is 200,000 USD. The respective winners will be awarded with 40,000 USD each.


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Anand on Chess and Energy: If you are happy with yourself, you won't feel your age!

Hello everyone,


Here is a great interview with former World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand. The world title challenger for 2014 spoke Indian sports magazine Sportstar in Chennai recently. We picked up the main quotes from the interview. Enjoy.

Getting his act together  

Back Home... Anand with his wife Aruna and son Akhil at the Chennai airport after his victory in the Candidates Tournament. Photo: R Ragu


- I kept faith that one day the phase will be over. 

- London was more positive in a certain way. I felt I was playing more freely. Okay, I got punished by Vlady (Vladimir Kramnik). Beyond that, I actually played a good tournament. Zurich was a bit harder. I didn’t see why I was again starting the same way. In the last three rounds I kind of stabilised but nothing really to look back on.

- Before Khanty Mansisyk, the best thing I did was not to think too much. I spent two weeks doing nothing, fooling around with Akhil (son), and not thinking about what happened. Looking for explanations can sometimes kill you when you can’t do anything about certain things. So I decided to simply stop doing that. It’s a waste of time. No point looking for explanations, trying to understand what happened.

- I had a short training session with (Polish Grandmaster Radoslaw) Wojtaszek, and then I sent the results of that work to Sandipan (Chanda). Then I played a Bundesliga weekend. And before going to Khanty, I thought the best thing was not to look at chess but to let the mind just get away from it. I did not think of any opponent. Let’s say, I had done a lot of thinking over the last year.

- My mind was blank. I got on with the job of looking at my openings, going through scenarios. I was just working on the preparations. Since I had taken two weeks off from chess, I thought it was time to get back to it.

- It was nice to beat Aronian, for the first time in my life, with white (pieces). It was a nice game as well. Quite a few others said this about the game. Then I knew this was a wonderful result to put into the bank, forget about it and think about the next 13 games. At least, you know that you have some balance in the bank. Obviously, at that point, it was too early but I knew the tie-break would be nice and so on.

- Generally, I was very contented (going into the first rest day with two wins). I slept very well that evening. It is also a very nice feeling when you have a good result like that and then you can have a rest day. So we (Anand and Sandipan) went to a Georgian restaurant the night before the rest day. That, more or less, became a habit to go to that restaurant every night before a rest day. That also gave some variety to our food. You start to feel positive. Suddenly, you find yourself thinking ambitiously and then you remind yourself to wait.

- In the game with Karjakin, I knew I had messed up something. In fact, I read somewhere that the most absurd thing was that I played defensively against Karjakin and I was punished as a result. I don’t understand this nonsense. This is so clearly wrong. Look at my game with Karjakin. I was not being punished for being defensive. I was punished for sacrificing a pawn, charging ahead and following it up incorrectly. So I knew I had made a tactical mistake. I had to sit and defend carefully. And I got on with it. Basically, the thought of losing was so repulsive that I raised my level.

- Going by your reaction after the draw with Karjakin, you looked ready to mock-strangle him?
That is basically what I told him. I would have mock-strangled him. We both started laughing at that time. He was very sweet. The first thing (after the game), he shook hands and congratulated me. And then there was my mock reaction. I didn’t know that was being photographed.

- Apart from the games you won, which were your other games that left you satisfied?
I was happy with the way I drew with Aronian. Despite the fact that it was a short game, I thought, in an unknown position, I actually went for the most courageous moves, or the most principled moves, if you like. No hanging back or second guesses. I just saw the best moves and that was good. The first draw against Andreikin and (Peter) Svidler were also good games.

- Though you admitted you were tired after the 13th round, your energy levels appeared good.
I think it is a question of happiness. If you are winning games, playing well and you are happy with yourself, you won’t feel your age. If it is depressing and you are struggling, you’ll feel more than your age. In that sense, what I meant was, a result like this will boost my energy and my enthusiasm. That is more important than anything else.

- You gained the right to challenge Magnus Carlsen, collected 15 rating points, a good share of the prize-money and much more. But what would you choose as your biggest gain from Khanty?
I had used this expression a couple of times... for me, it felt like ‘oxygen.’ I really needed it at that point. It is only so long that you can go on with bad results. For the first time, in a long time, I did not have to explain to anyone as to what happened and what went wrong. It was nice to just stop doing that.

- How much of the unused preparations (against Carlsen) did you use in Khanty?
Definitely my play was based on my unused preparations for the match. But I did not get to use a lot from them, anyway. Obviously, I did not want to have a big training camp for this because I simply did not need it.

- Did you play more aggressively than you did in the World title-match in Chennai?
I would agree that in a sense I tried to be a bit relaxed. I was trying to play in a controlled way and I gave up on that. I played a lot lighter when I was young.

- How do you deal with the accusation (from some section of the chess world) that you keep your preparations under wraps for the tournaments and play seriously in the World title clashes?
Such a statement is one of those things floating around and I have no idea where it came from. I never withheld preparations from my tournaments. I would often say that my focus had been on the matches. I meant my mental focus. Not that I am playing second-rate stuff (in tournaments). My point is, I honestly don’t follow this stuff. The thing is, this is perfectly normal behaviour.

Fans in any sport have animated discussions, speculate what is happening between this and that. They try to get to ulterior motives. That’s how they enjoy their sport, which is fine. Equally, it’s my job not to read this stuff because it’s meant to annoy me. It’s relevant... well let them have their fun. That’s what they are supposed to do. I am not going to do it. I just think some of the explanations they come up with are reasonably good guesses, even if they are not correct. Some tend to be accurate but I cannot even see them. The point is, it doesn’t matter to me. It doesn't matter if they hit on something that might turn out to be a good explanation. I don’t particularly think the way you play chess is to solicit second opinion. At least, that is not the way I play chess. When I play chess, I am solving problems, having fun.

From my point of view, I can say that it is a very silly idea that I was holding something back (in tournaments). I would have gladly used all my ideas if I could. But may be, my preparation for matches was so oriented towards one opponent that it was hard to find ideas that I could use against others. Or, perhaps, I was unable to focus on tournaments with the same intensity as matches. These are statements that I can live with. But saying that I withheld something because I felt in some way playing tournaments like this was okay, I think it’s an insane idea.

- On coming back, were there any celebrations at home?
Not in a formal way. I spent the afternoon tickling Akhil. It was a pleasant day of phone calls from friends. That’s celebration enough. Akhil came to the airport. He was very excited because there were planes in the background. He kept touching my photo and said papa... papa...When I came out, he was very excited to see the real thing. He came running to me and kept saying... aple... aple... (for aeroplane) and he kept pointing at the back. I couldn’t have asked for a more touching reception.


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Thursday, April 17, 2014

Dave and Dusty Cute Kid, Pooch Chess Video (1947)

Hello everyone,





We found this cute chess video dating 1947 on YouTube. Enjoy.






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Shamkir April 19 Vugar Gashimov Memorial - World's Top Chess GMs Gather to Salute a Chess Star

Hello dear Chess Blog friends,




Vugar Gashimov Chess Memorial 2014

Shamkir - the city that lies quietly on the banks of River Chagirchay in the foothills of the Lesser Caucasus - is named after the brightest of stars, the Sun. 

Come April 19 and some of the world's best chess stars will gather in the Azerbaijan city to pay homage to another star - Vugar Gashimov. Gashimov is no more, but his beautiful chess remains with us forever. A chess memorial attended by the world's best could alone be a befitting tribute to Vugar Gashimov.

There will be two groups - A and B.



The official website of the event will transmit live all the games along with commentary, in English, Russian, and Azerbaijani, by some of the best in the chess world. 


The Azeri comments will come from Grandmasters, honored coach of Azerbaijan, FIDE trainer Anar Allahverdiyev and coach of the national team of teenagers Farid Abbasov.

Two-time Wijk-aan-Zee champion, Olympiad and European Championship participant, honored FIDE coach Gennady Sosonko will also be part of the commentary team.

Along with Sosonko, coach of Vugar Gashimov Viorel Iordakescu will comment the games in English. Sergey Shipov, one of the world's most famous commentators will comment in Russian.

The tournament is hosted and organised by "Synergy Group" which works "For a sustainable future". The opening ceremony will be held on April 19 at Heydar Aliyev Center in Shamkir. Established in 2010, Synergy Group is one of the largest private investment holdings in Azerbaijan. The Group invests in a number of strategic industry areas with high growth potential. Synergy Group successfully operates a dynamic portfolio of 28 diverse and growth-oriented businesses and with all its companies employs more than 1500 people.
Vugar Gashimov

Born on July 24th, 1986 in Baku, Vugar Gashimov achieved his peak ranking-world#6 in November, 2009. He has been the winner of Baku Grand Prix. Representing Azerbaijani team, he became the European champion in 2009. He played a crucial role in the historical victory of the national team at the European Championship held in Serbia. In 2011 he became the winner of Reggio Emilia chess tournament held in Italy since 1958. Playing on behalf of several chess clubs, he became the champion of Croatia, Turkey, Romania, Iran, Spain and Moldova. A silver-medalist, Gashimov was known as a particularly strong blitz chess player. Owner of more than 72 titles, Vugar Gashimov is the winner of Kasparov Cup. For his individual indicators, he became silver medalist of the Chess Olympiad held in 2008. He is also a silver and bronze-medalist of the World Intellectual Games.

Vugar Gashimov passed away on January 10th, 2014 in Heidelberg, Germany at the age of 27. The grandmaster from Baku had been ill for a long time and was under treatment for the last 1.5 years.

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Medieval Chess Set - Impressive, Creative Hobby Project

Hello Chess Blog friends,

We were just sent these lovely photos by MarvelStanley via Facebook. A reddit user uploaded these amazing pictures of a medieval chess set created by his mother. Here are the photos and you can read more at viralnova.

The project took Pamela about 6 months to complete and it’s currently sitting in her basement waiting for a gallery. Each piece is hollow, and as such are lighter than they look. The tallest king is around 6″.

Pamela's official website is pmummy.com where she states that she is enchanted by the human form that also inspires her.

Enjoy the chess set folks!







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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Anand has New Plans for Magnus - World Chess Championship 2014

Hello everyone,



Former World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand has said he is going to have new plans in place to take on Magnus Carlsen in 2014 in a bid to get his world title back!

Speaking to Indian journalists in New Delhi, the 44-year-old Anand said delay in addressing his errors cost him the World title and it was his decision to stay away from chess, which helped him to recover emotionally and bounce back with a bang.

"I think many errors had cropped up in my approach to play chess. I was becoming reliant on computers and there were some mistakes coming up. I was not oblivious to it but I was not able to address the problem exactly right. I didn't have time to fix anything," Anand, who was to highlight the role of chess in Business Analytics in an NIIT event, said.
"I remembered long back once after the end of an event, me and (Anatoly) Karpov were talking. He mentioned that a player who had a bad tournament will take long time to recover from bad result because he was so much in love with the game and he didn't have something else to take his mind off chess.

"So I decided that it was more important to recover emotionally, after all, a result like this knocks the stuffing out of you. So in December and January, I was trying to avoid chess. There were some tournaments which were unavoidable but most of the time I tried to get away from chess," he said.

Anand said: "May be my opponents didn't focus on me properly or probably I was playing more freely. I had one of my best results in Candidates and I'm playing in World Championship in November.

"I got my confidence back and I am very optimistic now. I know even if I face the same mistakes, I will act now differently," added Anand, who held the World title from 2007 to 2013.

"I was also lucky in a way that since my approach to the match backfired, I didn't get to use lot of my preparations and they were still there which I could carry over to the Candidates," he said.

"I had a short training camp in February. I thought it was enough and it was more important to spend time at home, play with my son and wait for the hunger to come back and when I went to Khanty (Mansiysk), the first game went brilliantly, it was my first win over (Levon) Aronian and it gave a big boost to me," added Anand, a Padma Vibhushan awardee.

Anand says he has a fair idea where he wants to work on before he takes on Carlsen later this year.

"I have a fair bit of idea what I want to change and what I think went wrong. So I have an idea what I want to do. So I will choose my team accordingly. But right now, I don't want to give any details," Anand said.

"Secondly, I'm waiting for the bid. The bidding procedure will finish by the end of this month. So after that we will have an idea of the venue. It is roughly scheduled for November but I just want it to be confirmed," he added.

Asked about his upcoming tournaments, Anand said he will play a lot of rapid events this year.

"At the moment I am scheduled to play in Corsica in May. It is an exhibition event, then there is World Rapid and Blitz Championships (June 15-21) in Dubai and then I have an event in Geneva. I might put in another tournament but it depends on my training schedule. It is all very tentative," he said.

"It is nice to play rapid chess again. Last year, I didn't get to play any rapid event, so it is good. This year, I will compensate for last year," he added.

Asked if it would be a revenge match, Anand said: "Ya, well I will try to take the confidence to the World Chess Championship. It is inevitable that we will remember some aspects of that match but I will try to take it as a fresh match.

"The previous results will obviously have some influence on my thoughts but it will be a different match. I will try to change the course and he is going to anticipate. I will think about what happened and try to give it a different twist this time," he said. (via Chess Magazine Black and White)

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Chess Girl in Wrong-Chair Horror: Name Them!

Hi everyone,

Here is a photo by Alina l’Ami during Round 6 at the ongoing Khanty Mansiysk Women's Chess Grand Prix.

You chess trivia question is: Name all the three chess players! Not only did the lady in bright blue earlier sit at the wrong table, but also prepared for the wrong opponent. However, it's fun to see her taking the horror of it all in her stride! You can find the answers here where there's a photo of one of the most disciplined chess stars as well! ;)


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Romain Edouard wins Dubai Chess Open 2014

Hello everyone,
Romain Edouard (right) and Anton Korobov of Ukraine in the final round of the 16th Dubai Open Chess Championship on April 15, 2014. Looking on are Dubai Chess Club Mohammad Husseini of Egypt (right) and Deputy Chief Arbiter IA Naji Mohamad Al Radhi of the UAE.

Dubai: French Grandmaster (GM) Romain Edouard, 23, defeated top seed GM Anton Korobov of Ukraine on Tuesday to win the 16th Dubai Open Chess Championship alone in first place, undefeated with an impressive 8 points out of 9 rounds.

Edouard won the Shaikh Rashid Bin Hamdan Al Maktoum Cup and the top cash prize of $10,000 in the event organised by the Dubai Chess Club in Dubai, UAE.

The Frenchman played the Black side of a Queen’s Pawn game and sacrificed the exchange of a Rook for Knight on the 30th move to expose his opponent’s castled King. Faced with a mating net, Korobov resigned two moves later.

Erstwhile leader GM Abhijeet Gupta of India lost to GM Eduardo Iturrizaga of Venezuela. Gupta used the Gruenfeld defense but was squeezed in as Iturrizaga maintained the initiative of the White pieces and controlled the center files.

Gupta was forced to exchange Queens on the 22nd move and lost two pawns which proved crucial in the endgame where he resigned on the 51st move. The win gave Iturrizaga a total of 7 points and a share of 2nd and 3rd places.

Grandmaster Yuriy Kozubov of Ukraine extracted revenge against Russian GM Aleksandr Rakhmanov to finish in a tie Iturrizaga at 7 points each. Kuzubov crushed the Modern Defense of Rakhmanov in 58 moves. The Ukrainian created passed pawns on both wings and managed to promote his pawn to a Queen when the Russian resigned on the 58th move.

Gupta finished in a tie for 4th to 9th places at 6.5 points each together with GMs Zaven Andriasian and Tigran L. Petrosian of Armenia, Hrvoje Stevic of Croatia, Andrei Istratescu of France and Gawai Jones of England.

Andriasian beat GM Anuar Ismagambetov of Kazakhstan, Petrosian outplayed IM Ebrahim Ahmadinia of Iran, Stevic and Jones drew with each other while Istratescu won over Pontus Carlsson of Sweden.

Nineteen other players trail with 6 points each to share in the spoils of the $50,000 total prize fund, namely Korobov Anton of Ukraine, Rakhmanov Aleksandr or Russia, Akopian Vladimir of Armenia, Kotsur Pavel and Petr Kostenko of Kazakhstan, Balogh Csaba of Hungary, Rahman Ziaur of Bangladesh, Brkic Ante and Jankovic Alojzije of Croatia, Ghaem Maghami Ehsan of Iran, Solak Dragan of Turkey, Shyam Sundar and Babu Lalith of India, Bogner Sebastian and IM Nico Georgiadis of Switzerland, Amin Bassem of Egypt, Iordachescu Viorel of Moldova, Mchedlishvili Mikheil of Georgia, Stojanovic Mihajlo of Serbia.

A total of 148 players from 39 countries participated in the 16th Dubai Open Chess Championship including 38 GMs and 8 WGMs, 16 IMs, 3 WIMs, 10 FMs and 5 WFMs.

Since its inception in 1999, the Dubai Open has been considered one of the major Swiss open tournaments in the chess world. Top boards were broadcast live on the Dubai Chess Club web site where viewers may download games and photos and find links to round by round video coverage on Youtube. Visit chess-results.com for results and final standings. (Report via GulfNews.com)

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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Tough-Girl Chess Trivia Photo: Name this former World Champion

Hello everyone,

It's time to check your chess history knowledge: Can you name this former Women's World Chess Champion, her country and years of reign?


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Are Girls Bad at Chess? No, but Stereotypes Affect: Scientific American Report

Hello everyone,

The Scientific American has published a well-written and surely must-read one on whether girls are bad at chess. The writer, Daisy Grewal holds a BA in psychology from UCLA and a PhD in social psychology from Yale University. She currently works at Stanford University as an applied researcher.

Grewal has built her articles around the premise of stereotypes influencing behaviour and ability. She writes, "Rothgerber and Wolsiefer surveyed 77 girls between the ages of 6 and 11 and found that the girls showed awareness of the stereotype that boys are better at playing chess than girls. The researchers then gathered and analyzed data obtained from the United States Chess Federation (USCF). The data included information about female players from elementary, middle, and high schools who had competed in twelve tournaments. To control for the possibility that all chess players, both male and female, perform worse when playing against a male opponent, the researchers included a comparison group of young male players."
To test for stereotype threat effects, the researchers needed a way to determine whether girls’ chess-playing ability matches up to their actual performance, when playing against boys. Fortunately, the USCF calculates “preratings” that measure the strength of each player, based on their previous chess performance. The researchers used these preratings to determine an expected winning percentage for each game played by a participant. This expected winning percentage was then compared to a player’s actual winning percentage for each game (100% for a win, 50% for a draw, and 0% for a loss). Because the formula for the expected winning percentage takes into account the preratings of both competitors, failure to achieve an expected win cannot be explained simply by having played against a stronger opponent.
The results showed that when playing against a boy, girls were less likely to achieve an expected win. However, this was only true when they were playing moderate or strong (but not weak) male opponents. Since stereotype threat is supposed to be most pronounced in challenging rather than easy situations, it makes sense that the girls were more likely to falter when playing moderately or very challenging opponents but not weaker ones.

You can read the original article at Scientific American.

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10th Asian Schools Chess Championships 2014 in Taipei Aug 23

Hello chess friends, 

The Chinese Taipei Chess Association under the auspices of FIDE and Asian Chess Federation, have the honor to invite all FIDE affiliated Asian National Chess Federations to participate in the 10th Asian Schools Chess Championships 2014 (under-5, under-7, under-9, under-11, under-13, under-15 & under-17 Open and Girls) in Taichung, Taiwan from 23rd August (arrival) to 30th August (departure) 2014.

Invited (official) Players - Every Asian National Chess Federation can register one official player in each category (under 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 & 17 years old, open and girls), totalling a maximum of fourteen (14) invited players. No replacement from other categories can be made in case there is no official player in one category.
Additional Players- All additional players are welcome to participate in the championship. Additional players are responsible for all their own costs

The players must be below the respective age groups on or before 1st January 2014.

The complete registration form must include the surname/s, first name/s, FIDE ID number, FIDE rating and title, and passport number of each player and each accompanying person. The registration form must also include a copy of the passport page with photograph. It must also include the name and telephone/ email/ fax number of the Delegation chief and of the person in charge in the Federation. Both member Registration forms and federation registration form must be filled and returned to the Organizers by the National Federations, no later than 15st July 2014.


For detailed regulations check the official notification.

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Sergey Karjakin: Russia’s Next Chess Sensation

Hello everyone,

|The Russia & India report has a nice profile of Sergey Karjakin - Russia's next chess sensation. Enjoy.


Sergey Karyakin, the 24-year-old Russian grandmaster. Source: Vladimir Vyatkin / RIA Novosti

Sergey Karjakin, the 24-year-old Russian Grandmaster born in Simferopol, entered the Guinness Book of World Records at the age of 12. At the 2014 Candidates tournament, which was held in Khanty-Mansiysk, he finished in second place behind former world champion Viswanathan Anand. Karjakin can now regard himself as the third best chess player in the world, behind world champion Magnus Carlsen and Anand.

Unable to live without chess

“I started playing chess when I was a little over five years old,” Karjakin said. “I was at home, watching TV, when I suddenly heard in a commercial: ‘A Pawn becomes a queen.’ I asked my father: ‘What is this about?’ He explained to me that this is about figures in a chess game. He showed me how to play, and I loved it. Once, when I was walking with my mother in Simferopol, we suddenly walked past the Palace of the Pioneers. Mom told me that when I am old enough, I will attend their chess club. A few days later we were once again walking past that place and I asked my Mom: ‘Mom, please, sign me up for that chess club now, I can’t live without chess.’ The coach checked the way I play, and let me sign up for the club, despite the fact that the other guys were much older than me.”

From Ukraine to RussiaKarjakin’s professional growth slowed down for a while, when he, while still a citizen of Ukraine, was faced with the lack of qualified teachers. Already the winner of the 2009 World Chess Olympiad as a part of the Ukrainian team, Karjakin obtained Russian citizenship and moved to Moscow.

Shortly after this event Karjakin’s marriage with Ukrainian chess player Catherine Dolzhikova fell apart. He now has a girlfriend named Galia, who he met at one of his tournaments. Galia is responsible for the grandmaster’s personal site and she is also a professional photographer.

Personal manager and supercomputerAfter moving to Russia, Karjakin’s results went straight uphill. He became the winner of several competitions of the highest category and in 2012 he won the world title in speed chess. About two years ago, Karjakin concluded a long-term sponsorship agreement with Alpari and hired a personal manager.

“It is very important to have a permanent sponsor,” Karjakin said. “For example, to simply buy a computer filled with cutting-edge chess software it will cost about $50,000. Besides this, it is important to contribute to keeping personal mentors and it is desirable to have trainers for physical preparation. Even the simplest training camp with accommodation and meals is very expensive. Alone, on your own prize earnings it will be impossible to upkeep this lifestyle and work pattern. It is easier for Magnus Carlsen – he has a huge number of advertising contracts. All of Norway is ready to work for Magnus.”
Friendship with Carlsen

In May 2013, Karjakin had one of his major victories, winning the super tournament in Stavanger, Norway, which included the ten best players of the world. The Russian grandmaster beat Carlsen, his main rival and host of the competition by just half a point. Six months later Carlsen, the Russian’s peer won the World Championship, beating Anand.

“Those who think that Magnuss and I are bitter rivals are completely wrong,” Karjakin said. “We are only rivals when it comes to the chessboard.. as for life - we are friends. We chat on the internet, communicate on Skype. I remember how once during a tournament in Moscow we went bowling and were out all night. At about 6 a.m. we decided to go home, but Magnus wanted to see what our city looks like. So we went down to the subway station when suddenly a group of guys ran up to us. They scared us a bit at first, but it turned out that they recognized Carlsen and wanted to take a picture with him. The Norwegian was pretty surprised.”

The road aheadDespite Karjakin’s many wins in different super tournaments, chess analysts believed that he was not yet ready to fight for the chess crown. But in Khanty-Mansiysk, the Russian made all the scepticism dissolve. Although he started the tournament on a bad note dropping to second to last place, Karjakin managed to win several times in the second round and eventually finished the competition in second place.

“In Khanty-Mansiysk I myself became fully aware of my potential,” Karjakin said. “I am 24 years old, and two year ago Boris Gelfand won the Candidates tournament while being 43 years old. So I still have everything ahead of me. I have been in the list of the top ten strongest chess players in the world for quite some time and this is a serious indicator of stability. But to be an equal to Carlsen is extremely difficult. His strongest feature is that he almost never makes mistakes, he plays like a machine. Right now I am not able to do the same.”

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Hollywood Star Will Smith supports Maurice Ashley's Millionaire Chess Open

Hello everyone,



“I commend Maurice for creating a venue that showcases chess to the world. The Millionaire Chess Open is a fantastic concept that will invigorate current players, and the next generation of Grandmasters.”
— Will Smith
About Millionaire ChessFounded in 2013 by International Grandmaster Maurice Ashley and Entrepreneur Amy Lee, Millionaire Chess is the highest-stakes open tournament worldwide with a record setting prize fund. On October 9-13, 2014, thousands of participants will come to Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada to play and hundreds of thousands will watch online. This unprecedented tournament will electrify chess fans worldwide. To learn more about Millionaire Chess, visit www.millionairechess.com. To receive updates on the event, join us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/millionairechess or on Twitter at: @highstakeschess

Here is the Millionaire Chess promo video



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